PowerBlock dumbbell workout

PowerBlock Dumbbell Workout: Use This Full-Body Exercise Routine To Build Muscle, Burn Fat, And Tone At Home!

Are you looking for inspiration on what to do with your PowerBlocks? Maybe you’re looking to buy a pair but don’t know how to use them? Then stick around! Below, I share a full-body PowerBlock dumbbell home workout as well as a complete list of exercises you can do with PowerBlocks.

PowerBlocks can be used to perform all dumbbell exercises including compound and isolation movements. Despite their unconventional shape, they are versatile free weights that function just like any other dumbbell. They are great for building muscle, burning fat, and increasing muscle tone.

I’ve used the PowerBlock Elites to help me transform a skinny frame into an athletic physique.

And this post reveals exactly how I did it!

The workout is based on the PowerBlock Elite, but it can also be used with the Sports and Pros.

Let’s POWER through (get it?).

How I used this PowerBlock dumbbell workout to build muscle and burn fat at home.
You can click the picture to find the cheapest PowerBlock price!

Recommended Gear For This PowerBlock Workout

This full-body dumbbell workout has been designed around the PowerBlock dumbbells.

It doesn’t matter which model you have because all PowerBlocks work the same way and are therefore used in the same manner.

With that said, here’s the list of equipment I currently use and recommend for this workout:

I used the PowerBlock Elite dumbbell for this workout.
You can click the photo to find the cheapest PowerBlock price!
  1. PowerBlocks (required). You’ll obviously need a pair of PowerBlock dumbbells for this workout! The PowerBlock Elite, Sports, and Pro series are all very good. Those looking to build muscle should go with the heavier models (50lbs+). Those looking to burn fat and tone can go with a light-moderate model (24-50lbs). In my opinon, the PowerBlock Elites (link for my hands-on review) offer the best value for a beginner-intermediate.
I combined the PowerBlock Elite dumbbell with the Flybird bench for this workout.
You can click on the pic to find the cheapest Flybird adjustable bench price!
  1. Flybird folding adjustable weight bench (optional). An FID (flat/incline/decline) bench isn’t essential for this workout. After all you can always swap the bench for the floor. But a bench allows you to capitalize on incline and decline angles to target specific regions of your body. A bench also gives you a full range of motion in your movements and allows you to lift heavier weights. This is important for gaining the full benefits from each exercise. You don’t have to buy the expensive PowerBlock bench. I use the affordable Flybird (link for cheapest price) and it does the job perfectly well!
You can use resistance bands to add weight to a PowerBlock dumbbell during a leg workout.
You can click on the photograph to find the cheapest Undersun band price!
  1. Undersun heavy-duty resistance bands (optional). Lower body exercises are inherrently limited by the weight of the dumbbell (which don’t go very high relative to how big your leg muscles are). I’m talking about movements like the squat and deadlift. You may quickly outgrow your PowerBlocks if you’re progressive overloading regularly. This isn’t a PowerBlock-specific limitation but a drawback with all dumbbells. I like to use heavy resistance bands like these Undersuns (link for the cheapest price) to add extra resistance in a convenient and cost-effective manner!

Not sure which PowerBlock is right for you? You can check out my other post to learn more about the different PowerBlock models and which is the b1est!

A List Of PowerBlock Dumbbell Exercises You Can Do

I’ve categorized a selection of PowerBlock movements into the different muscle groups they target.

Here’s a comprehensive list of different exercises you can do with a PowerBlock dumbbell.

  • Arm exercises you can do with PowerBlocks:
Arm ExerciseMovement TypePrimary Target MusclesEquipment Required
Traditional bicep curlIsolationBiceps brachii short head, brachialis, brachioradialisDumbbell-only
Reverse-grip curlIsolationBrachioradialisDumbbell-only
Hammer curlIsolationBiceps brachii long head, brachialisDumbbell-only
Incline curlIsolationBiceps brachii long head, brachialis, brachioradialisBench + dumbbell
Spider curlIsolationBiceps brachii long and short headsBench + dumbbell
Concentration curlIsolationBiceps brachii long and short headsBench + dumbbell
Overhead tricep extensionIsolationTriceps long headDumbbell-only
Tricep kickback IsolationTriceps long headBench + dumbbell
SkullcrushersIsolationTriceps long headBench + dumbbell
Close-grip bench pressCompoundTriceps medial and lateral headBench + dumbbell
Diamond-grip dumbbell push upCompoundTriceps medial and lateral headDumbbell-only
  • Chest exericses you can do with PowerBlocks:
Chest ExerciseMovement TypePrimary Target MusclesEquipment Required
Flat bench pressCompoundPectoralis major, pectoralis minor, anterior deltoidsBench + dumbbell
Incline bench pressCompoundUpper pectoralsBench + dumbbell
Decline bench pressCompoundLower pectoralsBench + dumbbell
Flat dumbbell flyIsolationPectoralis major, pectoralis minorBench + dumbbell
Incline dumbbell flyIsolationUpper pectoralsBench + dumbbell
Decline dumbbell flyIsolationLower pectoralsBench + dumbbell
Close-grip bench pressCompoundPectorals, tricepsBench + dumbbell
Dumbbell pull-overCompoundPectorals, anterior deltoids, latissimus dorsiBench + dumbbell
Dumbbell push-upCompoundPectoralis major, pectoralis minor, anterior deltoidsDumbbell-only
  • Shoulder exercises you can do with PowerBlocks:
Shoulder ExerciseMovement TypePrimary Target MusclesEquipment Required
Overhead shoulder pressCompoundAnterior deltoids, medial deltoids, posterior deltoids, tricepsBench + dumbbell
Hammer pressCompoundAnterior deltoids, medial deltoids, posterior deltoids, tricepsBench + dumbbell
Lateral raiseIsolationMedial deltoidsDumbbell-only
Front raiseIsolationAnterior deltoidsDumbbell-only
Incline reverse fly on a benchIsolationPosterior deltoidsBench + dumbbell
ShrugsIsolationTrapeziusDumbbell-only
Arnold pressCompoundAnterior deltoids, medial deltoids, posterior deltoids, triceps, bicepsBench + dumbbell
Upright rowCompoundMedial deltoids, bicepsDumbbell-only
  • Back exercises you can do with PowerBlocks:
Back ExerciseMovement TypePrimary Target MusclesEquipment Required
Overhand bent-over rowCompoundTrapezius, rhomboids, latissimus dorsiDumbbell-only
Underhand bent-over rowCompoundTrapezius, rhomboids, latissimus dorsi, bicepsDumbbell-only
Narrow-grip bent-over rowCompoundRhomboids, latissimus dorsi, bicepsDumbbell-only
Bent-over hammer rowCompoundRhomboids, latissimus dorsi, bicepsDumbbell-only
Reverse flyIsolationRhomboids, posterior deltoidsDumbbell-only
Incline reverse fly on a benchIsolationTrapezius, posterior deltoidsBench + dumbbell
Renegade rowCompoundTrapezius, rhomboids, latissimus dorsi, deltoids, biceps, core, glutesDumbbell-only
Dumbbell-weighted pull-upsCompoundTrapezius, rhomboids, latissimus dorsi, biceps, corePower tower + dumbbell
ShrugsIsolationTrapeziusDumbbell-only
  • Abdominal exercises you can do with PowerBlocks:
Ab ExerciseMovement TypePrimary Target MusclesEquipment Required
Dumbbell crunchIsolationAbdominals, obliquesDumbbell-only
Decline dumbbell sit upIsolationAbdominals, obliques
Kneeling woodchopperIsolationAbdominals, obliquesDumbbell-only
Hanging leg raiseIsolationLower abdominalsPower tower + dumbbell
Lying leg raiseIsolationLower abdominalsDumbbell-only
Dumbbell plankCompoundFull-body with emphasis on coreDumbbell-only
Russian twistIsolationAbdominals, obliquesDumbbell-only
Dumbbell side bendIsolationObliquesDumbbell-only
  • Leg exercises you can do with PowerBlocks:
Leg ExerciseMovement TypePrimary Target MusclesEquipment Required
Shoulder front squatCompoundQuadriceps, hamstrings, calves, glutes, deltoidsDumbbell-only
Dumbbell squatCompoundQuadriceps, hamstrings, calves, glutes, deltoidsDumbbell-only
Goblet squatCompoundQuadriceps, hamstrings, calves, glutesDumbbell-only
Bulgarian split squatCompoundQuadriceps, hamstrings, calves, glutesBench + dumbbell
Sumo pile squatCompoundEmphasis on hamstrings and glutesDumbbell-only
Deadlift with dumbbellsCompoundFull-bodyDumbbell-only
Romanian deadliftCompoundEmphasis on hamstrings and glutesDumbbell-only
LungeCompoundQuadriceps, hamstrings, calves, glutesDumbbell-only
Farmers walkCompoundQuadriceps, hamstrings, calves, glutes, deltoidsDumbbell-only

Can PowerBlocks Be Used To Do All Dumbbell Exercises?

Yup!

Powerblocks can be used to do all of the most popular exercises, as well as the more unorthodox movements.

PowerBlock dumbbells can be used in all the popular dumbbell exercises.
You can click the picture to find the cheapest PowerBlock price!

Examples of popular movements include:

  • Presses.
  • Rows.
  • Curls.
  • Extensions.
  • Squats.
  • Deadlifts.

These types of exercises require you to grip the PowerBlock on the handle, just like any other dumbbell.

You’ll need an adjustable weight bench to fully capitalize on all of these movements. For example, exercise variations like the incline bench press and split squat can only be performed safely using a bench.

PowerBlock dumbbells can even be used in all the unorthodox dumbbell exercises.
You can click on the photo to get the cheapest PowerBlock price!

Examples of unorthodox (not so popular) movements include:

  • Dumbbell pull-overs.
  • Leg-raises.
  • Crunches.
  • Dumbbell pull-ups.

These types of exercises require you to grip the dumbbell outside the handle. This may be awkward with the PowerBlocks since they don’t have a conventional dumbbell shape.

But it’s still possible to use trial and error to adjust and find a grip that’s safe and comfortable to do these movements with.

Next, I’ll show you how to combine the PowerBlock exercises into a full-body routine to build muscle and burn fat at home!


Confused about which PowerBlock is best for you? You can check out my other article to find out how much each PowerBlock weighs and which are expandable!

Full-Body PowerBlock Dumbbell Workout Program

This full-body home exercise routine is suitable for anyone with a pair of PowerBlocks.

It can be performed by beginners and intermediate lifters alike (increase weight according to your own fitness levels).

I used this PowerBlock dumbbell workout to build lean muscle and tone. But it can also be used to burn fat if you keep your calorie intake low.

The program consists of a 3-day full-body home training split as follows:

Training DayWorkout
1Full-body
2Rest
3Full-body
4Rest
5Full-body
6Rest
7Rest

You’ll work the entire body on each training day. And each workout is separated by at least 24 hours of rest as recommended by ACSM (American College of Sports Medicine).

It doesn’t matter which days you train.

What’s important is to space your workouts such that your body gets a full 24-48 hours recovery before being hit by the next session.

The exercises chosen for this program have been cherry-picked from the PowerBlock workout app and poster.

Each workout takes approximately 1-1.5 hours to complete depending on your rest time between sets.

Day 1 PowerBlock full-body dumbbell workout:
PowerBlock ExerciseSetsRepsRest Between SetsWeight
Flat bench press48-121-3 mins~80% of 1RM
Overhand bent-over row48-121-3 mins~80% of 1RM
Overhead shoulder press 48-101-3 mins~80% of 1RM
Decline dumbbell sit-ups410-151-3 mins~60% of 1RM
Goblet Squat410-151-3 mins~60% of 1RM
Hammer curl410-151-3 mins~60% of 1RM
Day 2 PowerBlock full-body dumbbell workout:
PowerBlock ExerciseSetsRepsRest Between SetsWeight
Incline bench press48-121-3 mins~80% of 1RM
Underhand bent-over row48-121-3 mins~80% of 1RM
Lateral raise410-151-3 mins~60% of 1RM
Russian twist410-151-3 mins~60% of 1RM
Deadlift with dumbbells410-151-3 mins~60% of 1RM
Overhead tricep extension410-151-3 mins~60% of 1RM
Day 3 PowerBlock full-body dumbbell workout:
PowerBlock ExerciseSetsRepsRest Between SetsWeight
Close-grip bench press48-121-3 mins~80% of 1RM
Bent-over hammer row48-121-3 mins~80% of 1RM
Hammer press48-101-3 mins~80% of 1RM
Dumbbell side bend410-151-3 mins~60% of 1RM
Bulgarian split squat48-121-3 mins~80% of 1RM
Bicep curl410-151-3 mins~60% of 1RM

What is 1RM?

1RM stands for 1 repetition maximum. It refers to the most weight you can lift for a single rep.
In workout programs, weights are usually given as a percentage of 1RM.

This standardizes the amount of weight you’re lifting according to your own fitness levels.

You can use the Strength Levels database to estimate your 1RM for each exercise. Then take a percentage of that number to determine how much weight you should lift.

For example, 80% of a 50lb dumbbell bench press 1RM would be 40lbs (50 x 0.8)

How To Do Each Exercise In This PowerBlock Dumbbell Workout

Below, you’ll find a guide on how to do each dumbbell exercise in this PowerBlock workout routine.

1) Flat Bench Press
How to do the flat bench press using PowerBlock dumbbells in a chest workout.
You can click on the photograph to find the cheapest Flybird bench price!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

25lbs/10lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

Overall chest builder that also improves your functional pushing strength!

Top Tip:

On the very last set, do AMRAP (as many reps as possible) of push-ups on PowerBlocks. This will be hard but it’s a great way to really fatigue the chest, burn calories, and get a huge pump!

2) Incline Bench Press
How to incline bench press with the PowerBlocks.
You can click on the photo to find the cheapest Flybird weight bench price!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

25lbs/10lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

Emphasizes the upper pectorals for balanced chest development and volume.

Top Tip:

Keep your elbows tucked in rather than flared out. Most people find this to be more comfortable and it also reduces the likelihood of shoulder pain/injury due to internal rotation. Additionally, studies have shown that a 30° incline is the best for activating the upper pecs!

3) Close-Grip Bench Press
How to do the close-grip bench press using PowerBlock dumbbells.
You can click on the pic to get the cheapest Flybird gym bench price!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

25lbs/10lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

Works the chest but also shifts a lot of emphasis onto the triceps for well-defined arms!

Top Tip:

It can be tempting to push with just the arms. But remember this is predominantly a chest exercise. Focus on pushing the PowerBlock upwards by contracting your chest. This will give you the full benefits of this exercise.

You’ll need a weight bench like this Flybird (link for cheapest price) to do any kind of bench press!

4) Overhand Bent-Over Row
How to overhand bent-over row using PowerBlock dumbbells in a back workout.
You can find the cheapest PowerBlock price by clicking on the photo!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

20lbs/10lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

An all-round back exercise that will help you build a solid v-shaped body. It’s the pulling equivalent to the bench press.

Top Tip:

To activate all your back muscles evenly- bend your knees slightly, make sure your back is leaned forward at an approximately 45° angle from the floor, and pull the PowerBlock towards your navel (belly-button).

5) Underhand Bent-Over Row
How to underhand bent-over-row using PowerBlocks.
You can find the cheapest PowerBlock price by clicking on the photograph!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

20lbs/10lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

Similar to the overhand bent-over row but shifts emphasis onto greater biceps activation!

Top Tip:

Let the PowerBlocks go all the way down (to the point they can no longer go any further) before pulling them back up. This is called a full range of motion (ROM). It ensures full activation of your lats, traps, rhomboids, AND biceps.

6) Bent-Over Hammer Row
How to do the hammer row using PowerBlock dumbbells.
You can get the cheapest PowerBlock price by clicking on the photograph!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

20lbs/10lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

A variation of the bent-over row that shifts the emphasis onto the latissimus dorsi (“lats”) for a strong V-tapered flare!

Top Tip:

The PowerBlocks should drop all the way down to achieve a full ROM and maximize lat activation.

7) Overhead Shoulder Press
How to do the overhead shoulder press using PowerBlocks  in a shoulder workout.
You can get the cheapest PowerBlock price by clicking on the pic!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

20lbs/7.5lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

THE absolute best exercise for general shoulder development and toning.

Top Tip:

Keep the movement compact. Do this by keeping your elbows tucked towards the torso and the PowerBlocks stacked on top of your elbows. This helps you shift heavier weights whilst also reducing the likelihood of shoulder pain.

8) Lateral Raise
How to perform the lateral raise with PowerBlock dumbbells.
You can get the cheapest PowerBlock price by clicking the photo!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

5lbs/2.5lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

Targets the side shoulders. Performed using a light weight, it will tone and define the deltoids. Performed using a heavy weight and it will help you build “shoulder boulders”!

Top Tip:

Sit on a bench and lean slightly forwards. The PowerBlocks should travel upwards and slightly forwards rather than directly to your sides. This helps to localize tension directly onto the shoulders.

9) Hammer Press
How to perform the hammer press using PowerBlocks in a shoulder workout.
You can find the cheapest PowerBlock price by clicking the photograph!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

20lbs/7.5lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

Shifts emphasis onto the anterior deltoids for more pronounced front shoulders!

Top Tip:

Vary the distance between the PowerBlocks to target different regions of your shoulders. Widening the distance emphasizes the side shoulders whilst narrowing the distance emphasizes the front shoulders.

10) Decline Dumbbell Sit-Ups
How to decline sit-up with PowerBlock dumbbells in an ab workout.
You can click on the picture to find the cheapest Flybird gym bench price!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

None (master bodyweight first before adding 5lb increments).

What It’s Good For:

A classic ab-builder to help those six-pack abs pop out (assuming you also have a low body fat percentage)! The decline puts you in a deficit position to make the movement much harder.

Top Tip:

Practice bodyweight ab crunches first before holding a PowerBlock against your chest. Once this is comfortable, you can move onto the decline dumbbell sit-up to really hit your core and build tone in your abdominal region.

You’ll need a declining weight bench like the Flybird (link for best price) to do this exercise.

11) Russian Twist
How to perform the Russian twist with PowerBlocks in an ab workout.
You can find the cheapest PowerBlock price by clicking the pic!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

None (master bodyweight first before adding 5lb increments).

What It’s Good For:

Hits the six-pack abdominals and the obliques at the same time for a shredded core!

Top Tip:

It can be hard to maintain balance during this exercise. So practice this movement without a dumbbell first. Once you’ve nailed the bodyweight version, you can hold a PowerBlock dumbbell between both hands to increase intensity.

12) Dumbbell side-bend
How to do dumbbell side bends using PowerBlocks.
You can get the cheapest PowerBlock price by clicking the photo!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

10lbs/5lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

Isolates the external and internal obliques which can help you develop V-cut abs.

Top Tip:

For maximum effect, you should “bend” in the horizontal and vertical plane, not just the horizontal plane. In other words, your torso should move front and back as well as side to side as you go through the movement. A common mistake is to just bend strictly in a side-to-side motion.

13) Deadlift With Dumbbells
How to deadlift with PowerBlock dumbbells in a leg workout.
You can click on the pic to find the cheapest PowerBlock price!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

25lbs/10lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

Classic total-body strength and muscle exercise that can also torch calories and burn fat!

Top Tip:

Deadlifts can be awkward with PowerBlock dumbbells because your feet can’t slide under the handle like in regular dumbells/barbells. Have them next to your feet instead!

14) Goblet Squat
How to do the goblet squat using PowerBlocks in a leg workout.
You can click on the photograph to find the cheapest Undersun band price!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

20lbs/15lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

A beginner-friendly squat variation that will build lower body muscle as well as torch calories and burn fat!

Top Tip:

Most people will outgrow their PowerBlocks (and most dumbbells for that matter) in no time since the legs are the largest muscles in your body, and you’re only lifting one dumbbell. I like to use heavy resistance bands like the Undersuns (link for the cheapest price) to add extra resistance conveniently and cost-effectively!

15) Bulgarian Split Squat
How to perform the Bulgarian split squat using PowerBlocks.
You can click on the photograph to get the cheapest Flybird adjustable bench price!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

25lbs/20lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

This is much harder than a conventional dumbbell squat because you’re pushing with one leg. This effectively doubles your PowerBlock weight. It’s great for building the quads, hamstrings, and glutes, as well as burning calories and fat.

Top Tip:

Your leading foot should be centered right in the middle of the 2 Powerblocks in each hand. Also fixating your gaze on a distant object. This helps you maintain balance as you go through the movement.

16) Hammer Curl
How to hammer curl using PowerBlock dumbbells in an arm workout.
You can click on the photo to find the cheapest PowerBlock price!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

7.5lbs/2.5lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

Targets the biceps short head which contributes to the biceps “peak” (or bulge)!

Top Tip:

Toning and building bigger arms is top of the agenda for a lot of people. And to do this, you need to include a variety of arm movements in your PowerBlock dumbbell workout. I recommend choosing 1-3 arm exercises at a time and cycling through the different movements every couple of months!

17) Overhead Tricep Extension
How to do the overhead tricep extension using PowerBlocks.
You can click on the picture to find the cheapest PowerBlock price!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

7.5lbs/2.5lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

Isolates all 3 triceps heads to give you toned and cut upper arms!

Top Tip:

Let the PowerBlock drop all the way down until it can touch your neck. This ensures you achieve the depth required to really stretch and activate the triceps.

18) Bicep Curl
How to do the bicep curl using PowerBlock dumbbells in an arm workout.
You can click on the picture to get the lowest PowerBlock price!

Recommended Beginners Weight:

7.5lbs/2.5lbs (men/women, per PowerBlock).

What It’s Good For:

Famous exercise that will target the biceps short head to build “thicker” looking biceps.

Top Tip:

Start the movement by gripping the PowerBlocks using a neutral grip (palms facing each other). As you curl the PowerBlock up, simultaneously rotate your wrists outwards. This leads to the best biceps activation. Wanna see how this works? Stick out your right fist and rotate it clockwise. You’ll see your biceps contract!


Interested in ordering PowerBlocks? You might want to check my other post which shares my experience on how long it takes PowerBlocks to deliver and how much shipping is.

Why This PowerBlock Dumbbell Workout Is Effective

Not many people enjoy working out 24/7 and I’m guessing that applies to you too!

This PowerBlock home dumbbell workout is based primarily on compound movements that activate multiple muscles in a single motion.

Not only does this give you more bang for your buck in terms of overall muscle gains, but it also means you’ll expend more calories if you’re goal is to burn fat and lose weight.

PowerBlock dumbbell workout results.

Note, this workout is just a guideline.

Feel free to include more isolation movements from my list of PowerBlock exercises should you wish.

These are great for building definition in specific muscles but aren’t so great for overall muscle-building/fat-burning.

This PowerBlock home workout is also volume-optimized.

This means you’re working each muscle with enough training volume (weight, reps, and sets per week) without running the risk of overtraining.

The 24-48 hour rest period between workouts is enough for most beginners to fully recover before the next session.

A word of nutrition advice…

Good nutrition is important for this PowerBlock workout to help you reach your goals.

If you’re trying to build muscle and tone, then stick to a mild 5-10% calorie surplus to lean bulk.

On the other hand, if you’re trying to lose weight and get ripped, then go with a 5% calorie deficit to cut.

Either way, you should eat around 1g of protein per lb of body weight per day.


Still unsure if the PowerBlocks give you good value for money? You can check out my other post to find out if PowerBlocks are worth it!

How To Progress With This PowerBlock Workout

I’ve given you approximate weight guidelines and starting weight recommendations.

But these are just guidelines for you to adjust according to your own strength.

You know you’ve chosen the perfect weight when each set is challenging enough to fatigue your target muscle but not so heavy that your form breaks down.

If you’re aiming to burn fat at home, then you can more or less stick to the same weight and control your nutrition (high-protein calorie deficit). Feel free to try out different exercises too.

But if you’re looking to build muscle at home, then you should apply progressive overload.

Overloading aims to increase exercise intensity as you become stronger.

As a result, you’ll keep your muscles challenged for growth.

You can apply progressive overload to your PowerBlock routine by increasing:

  • Weight. Add 2.5-5lbs per PowerBlock to isolation exercises and 5-10lbs per PowerBlock to compound exercises. Do this whenever you feel you’re ready. Once every 1-3 weeks is a good rule of thumb.
  • Sets. You can increase the number of sets you perform per workout. I wouldn’t go for more than 5 sets per exercise per workout though. Studies have suggested this leads to “wasted sets” where the additional work doesn’t confer additonal benefits (i.e. a law of diminishing returns).
  • Reps. You’ll notice I’ve given a rep range for each exercise in the PowerBlock routine. Start on the low end of the spectrum for each exercise and increase the reps within the specified range to raise intensity.
  • Training days. After 3-6 months you may feel confident about increasing to a 4-day full-body split. If you’re looking to build serious muscle, you could even try this 6-day dumbbell workout. It’s based on the Bowflex dumbbell but the same exercises can also be performed on PowerBlock dumbbells.

If you’re interested, you can check out my other post to find out if PowerBlocks or Bowflex dumbbells are better!

Equipment Used In This Workout

Conclusion

I’ve shared a complete list of PowerBlock dumbbell exercises and an example full-body PowerBlock dumbbell home workout routine.

This workout can be completed with all the PowerBlocks, including; the Elite, Sport, and Pro series.

They are extremely versatile dumbbells that can be used to build muscle, tone, burn fat, and get ripped.

Just remember to stick to a nutrition plan that benefits your training goal!

What do you think about my PowerBlock dumbbell workout?

Let me know in the comments!

You may also be interested in the downloadable Kalibre Blueprint PDF which details exactly how I gained 40lbs of lean muscle (it’s 100% free!). It details the exact exercises and nutrition I used to go from skinny to ripped!

Thanks for reading guys!

Peace Out,

Kal

(Biochemistry BSc, Biomedical Sciences MSc, Ex-Skinny Guy)

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